© 2019 by The New Current. 

Edinburgh Fringe Festival 2019 
Roisin Crowley Linton: "I remember going into our art lessons in Sixth Form, hungover, still in last nights makeup, 40 minutes late, and before I’d even got a chance to sit down I’d be telling everyone stupid stories about the night before and loving the feeling of making everyone laugh."
 
TEENAGE KICKS | Underbelly, Cowgate - Delhi Belly  
1-25 | 16:20 | TICKETS
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Teenagers are weird. Being a teenager is weird. Working with teenagers is weird. Especially when you work at a youth club by day and perform comedy, poetry and burlesque by night. This time we're talking about growing up in Newcastle, how hard it is to be sexy and how the kids are alright. 


Hi Roisin, thanks for talking to TNC, how are things going?


Hiya! Things are good! It’s funny looking back to how nervous I was this time last year for my debut Edinburgh show compared to now, makes all the difference having a good team around you and a bit of experience under your belt eh? 

Are you looking forward to be heading back to Edinburgh Fringe with Teenage Kicks?


Yes! I love being back with Underbelly, nicest crew around. 

In 2018 you won the Stamptown Newcomer Award, what did it mean to you to get this type of recognition for your show?


It was lush, they’re some of the funniest people around so it’s nice that they think I’m funny too. And they don’t mind that I make them do a little cry every time they watch my show!


(And it doesn’t hurt that they seem to cry a little every time they watch my show.)

What was the nicest & strangest comment you’ve had for your show?


In Brighton this year, I had a 15-year-old boy telling me I was his hero. His mum tweeted to me after. It absolutely made my day. 

Are there any nerves ahead of your fringe run?


Just the standard “God I hope people come and I hope they love me, please let the audience love me”. Anyone who says they don’t have those nerves are LIARS.

"A lot of the people who attend my sessions are young women who, when given a tool to channel their passions and frustrations, have the potential to achieve so much!"

Can you tell me a little bit about Teenage Kicks what can we expect?


A bit of stand up, a bit of poetry, some laughs, some tears, lots of cheers. 

What was the inspiration behind your show?


I work with lots of vulnerable young people and run sessions on poetry, stand-up, writing and devising. A lot of the people who attend my sessions are young women who, when given a tool to channel their passions and frustrations, have the potential to achieve so much! This made me reflect on my own adolescence and what made me such an ‘angry’ young women—just like them. 

Is it hard to stop from tweaking or changing a show once it’s running?


Yeah, I really like responding to the audience and what they might be thinking or getting excited about. My show is quite relaxed so each show ends up completely different. 

What have been some of the challenges you’ve faced bringing your show to the fringe?


Financially, this hasn’t been an easy path. I’m so proud of being fully self-funded, especially as an emerging artist working in the charity sector. 

"...it’s still nice to take myself more seriously and value my own work more!"

Have you always had a passion for comedy and performing?


Oh yeah, I’m a long-serving youth theatre kid, obv. I remember going into our art lessons in Sixth Form, hungover, still in last nights makeup, 40 minutes late, and before I’d even got a chance to sit down I’d be telling everyone stupid stories about the night before and loving the feeling of making everyone laugh.

What was your first time up on stage like?


Aww god, I was Mary in the nativity which was a VERY big deal in primary school. After the show, I found out I had sat cross-legged with my knickers on display the entire time. Pretty on brand.

Do you think your style and your approach to your show has changed much since you started?

Have I developed as an artist? No. Still chatting shit and drinking wine. But it’s still nice to take myself more seriously and value my own work more! 

What has been the best piece of advice you got when you started out?


A youth theatre director once told me I didn’t have to project as much as other people because I was already very loud. It still holds up.

Do you have any advice or tips for any emerging writer/performer?


Book the gig and THEN make the show and do what feels natural to you, even if it doesn’t fit neatly into one genre.

What 3 words best describe this show?


GIRLS GIRLS GIRLS.

And finally, what do you want your audiences to take away from Teenage Kicks?


Take a moment and think about your own adolescence and how it shaped you… and I want you to feel like you can cause some tiny riots too.