15th ÉCU Film Festival | 2020 
"As a filmmaker I want as many people as possible to watch my video and ÉCU festival will give me this huge opportunity."
Simone Marangi
 ALPHA 
European Music Video
simonemarangi.com
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A dark trip through vice and desire.

Hi Simone thank you for talking to TNC, how are you handling the lockdown?

I’m trying to handle the lockdown doing the same things I used to do before Covid-19 like reading, writing, playing sport and watching movies.

 


This period is giving me the time to finally develop my story’s idea that I got in my mind for a very long time.

As a filmmaker is this experience providing you with some creative inspiration?

Yes it is, but not about the Covid-19. It’s over discussed at the moment and I think adding more could be redundant. I’m interested in other themes now.

Your music video ALPHA has been selected for the 2020 ÉCU Film Festival in Paris, what has it meant to you to be part of this unique film festival for independent filmmakers?

I’m very glad that Alpha has been selected for the festival. As a filmmaker I want as many people as possible to watch my video and ÉCU festival will give me this huge opportunity

How did you get introduced to Thomas?

I was introduced to Thomas thanks to Lorenzo, the executive producer of the video.


After his first album’s publication, called Variations, he wanted to make a music video with one of his tracks and Lorenzo asked me if I was interested. I’ve always listened to electronic music and, in this case, I've really enjoyed and appreciated the album thanks to Thomas’s skills which I think they are able to perform such an extraordinary sounds that carry you in a totally different world. Alpha was the track I liked the most and in my opinion the best for a video.

Can you tell me a little bit about ALPHA what was the inspiration behind this music video?

The first inspiration came from the song.


It made me imagine a long and continuous movement into a dark place, a space in which majestic characters were floating in like gods.


Moreover the song reminds me about a ritual too because of the tribal sound. These were my initial ideas.


Then I started studying Thomas a bit since we haven’t met yet. That why I’ve decided to take a look at his instagram profile, included photos, what he used to wear and posing. I also read his interviews in order to find a character he could reminds me. The first idea was about being a dandy, probably influenced by “The picture of Dorian Grey” by Oscar Wilde that I was reading during that period.


From all these elements I started working on some characters lost in their vices and desires like if they were in ecstasy.

What was the most challenging scene for you to make?

Actually I didn’t find any difficulties making the scenes. While I was writing the creativity part, I knew all the budget and time limitations. Perhaps the most challenging part was the

pre-production one. The video is filmed through the long-take shot technique, where the camera’s movements, lights effects and acting have always followed the song’s rhythm. Anyway, the most important thing to me was studying all the shots before going to shoot in order to synchronise all these elements in a fast way. The set went well and I remember it was a satisfied and happy moment.

Looking back do you think there is anything you would have done differently?

No, I don’t. I’m quite indulgent with myself.

Have you always had a passion for filmmaking?

The passion for filmmaking has started late. At the beginning being a director wasn’t my main ambition because I was more focused on my first passion: editing video. In fact I started editing videos when I was 12/13 years old which were based on japanese anime. During my university’s years I had to make a short film for an exam with other schoolmates.

Even if I wrote the plot and edited the whole video, I didn’t like the film. So I decided to challenging myself and making another short video as director and I felt myself very comfortable in that shoes. I consider myself a little bit self-concentred person and that’s why I really enjoyed this new job.

How important is the collaborative nature of filmmaking?

It’s very important because filmmaking is a collaborative work. Every artist involved in a film adds something special to the final work. The film is the result of this artistic collaboration.

"It’s better doing what you think is good and funny for yourself."

Has your approach to your films changed much since your debut short?

Yes, it has. In the last two years I worked a lot in fashion films and this experience changed my approach to images, editing and narration style. If I directed Alpha 5 years ago it would have been totally different.

What has been the best piece of advice you have been given when you started out?

The best advice I have been given was “speak about yourself”. It’s the best way to fall in love with an idea, doing something original and overcome all the problems you could meet making a film.

Do you have any tips or advice to offer fellow filmmakers?

I think I’m too young to give advices but one of my rules is “do what you want to see on a screen”. In my opinion is important thinking like if you are the film’s public. It’s better doing what you think is good and funny for yourself.

What are you currently working on?

I’m working on a story, which I have been waiting to write since a very long time. My next goal is making this film.

And finally, what do you hope people will take away from ALPHA?

I hope they’ll feel a real emotion and sensation. It’s the only thing I want to communicate with this video.

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