BEST OF BFI FUTURE FILM FESTIVAL

"YOU DON'T NEED A GREAT CAMERA, YOU DON'T NEED AMAZING ACTORS...ALL OF THESE THINGS HELP, BUT IF THE STORY IS EXCELLENT, THAT IS WHAT WILL SHINE THROUGH ABOVE ALL ELSE."

Oli + Frank
Hoodie
11th BFI FUTURE FILM FESTIVAL 2018
BFI Patrons’ New Talent Award
Jan 28 - 16:00
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A kid stumbles madly through the bleak dystopian wastelands, battling against unbearable memories, confused and angry, descending into a hysteria. An anti-dance video, set in a world not too far from our own.

 

Hey Oli & Frank, thank you for talking to tNC, how's everything going?

Everything’s okay I guess. Just drank some orange juice, and ready to hit the festival.

What does it mean to you to be screening your music video for Little Grim - 'Hoodie' at this years BFI Future Film Festival?

Super exciting, we’ve been coming to the BFI to watch films at festivals for years and years now, but this is the first time we’ve had anything screened here.

What was it about the bands music that you really connected with as directors?

There’s so many emotional lows and highs in the song, that you don’t hear too often sung at an upbeat tempo, “I heard you cry last night”, for example. We thought we’d give it a shot!

'Hoodie' is going to be in the Turning Point section, are there any nerves ahead of the festival?

 

The thing we’re most nervous about has got to be the looming global disaster that climate change is fast becoming. But, in terms of the festival, we’re just really looking forward to it.

Can you tell me a little bit about Little Grim - 'Hoodie', how did the music video come about?

We’d had the pleasure of working with Little Grim before. They seemed like nice chaps, so we kept in contact.

What was the inspiration behind this video?

On the surface level, we wanted to make an anti-dance video, to try and create a fucked up mess that really visualises the undercurrent of pain throughout the song. We also wanted to subvert similar narratives where the female point of view is often ignored in favour of a male perspective of events.

How much did the film change from initial concept to final cut?

We’d planned for the whole thing to be set on a cold and foggy morning, scandi-noir style - but, typically, when it came to the shoot, it was the sunniest day ever - so not really sure what it looks like now.

What has been the biggest challenge you've faced bringing this all to life?

The cast and crew are all super talented, and good fun to work with, and this meant that everything kinda worked like a well oiled machine. However, the factory we filmed next to it is a sewage processing plant, so the smell of shit throughout the shoot was kind of inescapable, and haunts us to this day.

Since making this music video what would you say has been the biggest lesson you have taking from it?

Work with our cast and crew again!

Have you always had a passion for making videos?

Yes, but as adult life comes creeping in, it’s becoming harder and harder to sustain.

How did Do Not Entry come about?

Our eyes met across a smoky bar.

"Always try your best; you can’t do anything better than your best, so that’s what you should always strive for."

As a directing duo how important to you is the collaborative process of filmmaking?

When we’re making a film, we try and make as friendly an atmosphere as possible, so people can throw ideas around and improvise. Collaboration is key.

Since your debut short how has your approach to making your films changed?

We’ve had smaller and smaller budgets since then, so we’ve learnt to shoot with a skeleton crew, and to shoot fast.

Should filmmakers take more risks with the films/projects they make?

Yes. If filmmakers, especially from our generation, don’t take risks - we’ll all be making and re-making The King’s Speech on loop for eternity.

What has been the best advice you've been given?

Suggs from Madness drunkenly told us at a party once, “Just make shit - don’t matter if it’s shit - just make it.” Words of wisdom there.

For anyone out there thinking about making their first film what advice would you offer them? 

Listen to Suggs.

And finally, what do you hope people will take away from Little Grim - 'Hoodie'?

That there’s always two sides to a story.

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