77th Biennale Cinema 2020 
Orizzonti
Luca Ferri 

ferriferri.com

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A middle-aged man is looking at a series of encyclopaedic images of the creation of the cosmos, from which humanity is absent, apart from some of its works and their ruins. Lulled to sleep by an advertising spot, he will sink into a nightmare of arctic hunters intent on killing polar bears. In the meantime, two pieces of contemporary music by the composer Agazzi and a text referring to an episode of suicide that actually took place during the director’s childhood invite us to “write once, erase twice.”

Hello Luca thank you for talking to The New Current, have these very difficult times offered you some additional creative inspiration?

Hello and thank you for this interview.

These times have not given me any creative inspiration but they brought me to see difficulties as a challenge to overcome finding new ways to work on new projects.

Ahead of a festival like Venice do you ever get nervous about screening one of your films?

No, I never get nervous, instead I am glad to have the chance to show my films and to give visibility to the work of my crew.

Congratulations on having Sì selected for the 77th Venice Film Festival, what does it mean to you to be at the festival with your film?

Since it is a low-budget film, the presence in 77th Venice Film Festival can give back to the composer Dario Agazzi, the producer Andrea Zanoli and the editor Andrea Miele who hardly worked on “Sì” an important gratification. 

Can you tell me a little bit about Sì, what was the inspiration behind your latest film?

“Sì” starts from one of the most important books in my formation, “Ja” by Thomas Bernhard, to which the only explicit reference is the title, then deals with other aspects. Above all, a study on the balance between music, images and words.

What challenges did you face making Sì?

The primary challenge was to avoid that one of the used languages (music, images and words) overwhelmed the other two, searching for a balance. Furthermore, the text, which I personally wrote, is about a very delicate and personal memory of my childhood during which I faced death for the first time and it was a challenge to go back to that moment.

"...I must admit that I am open and permeable to the rare epiphanies that can happen with some of the works..."

Looking back at Sì, do you think there is anything you would have done differently?

No, otherwise I would not have considered “Sì” finished. I have the misfortune, or luck, who knows?, to have a job in addition to cinema, and this allows me to make independent decisions without any interference and be free to decide my times and ways of working on a project.

Where did your passion for filmmaking come from?
 

I don’t love cinema in a particular way, my main interests are literature, architecture and puppet theatre; cinema can be a large container in which all of them can come together.

Has your style and approach to your films changed much since your debut film?

I repudiated my very first films and left cinema for ten years, then I went back to cinema with a 4-year long work that ended with “Magog” and since then all the films I did are deeply different but cohesive with my idea of cinema. Even if my idea of cinema is strict, I must admit that I am open and permeable to the rare epiphanies that can happen with some of the works I run into, such as an architecture or a book, and this inevitably makes my mindset evolve.

Is there any advice you would offer any emerging filmmaker?

I don’t think I am the right person to give advice, my nature is to discourage any artistic desire.

"Above all, a study on the balance between music, images and words."

Is there any advice you would offer any emerging filmmaker?

I don’t think I am the right person to give advice, my nature is to discourage any artistic desire.

And finally, what do you hope audiences will take away from Sì?

This is a question I never asked myself and I believe that any director should never ask him/herself.

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