"THERE ARE STILL MANY UNTOLD STORIES AND THE TECHNOLOGY TO HELP US MAKE THESE FILMS IS ALWAYS IMPROVING."

Jazmine Lee
Seeing Blind
Nominations: Best Student Film 
Screening Session: Feb 28 | Nominated Films
3rd Papaya Rocks Film Festival Online
22-28 Feb 2021 | Tickets £5 / £10 Full 7-Day Pass: bit.ly/PRFF-Tickets
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Email

With the town’s river polluted, siblings, Will and Faith line up for water handed out by a generous robot. When the water is to be paid for, Will gets a suspicious feeling that not everything is as great as it seems and seeks to solve the mystery of the polluted river...

Hi Jazmine thank you for talking to TNC, how are you holding up during these very strange times?


Luckily Australia has pretty much returned to normal so I have been doing pretty well, I just have to get used to large crowds again!

Has this time offered you any creative inspiration?

Much! I started working full time in the animation industry and have been learning lots from other people. 

Congratulations on having your film selected for the 3rd Papaya Rocks Film Festival, what does it mean to you to be part of such an amazing lineup of short films?

Super exciting! It is always a joy to have something you made acknowledged by other people that share the same passion as you. 

Can you tell me a little bit about your film, how did this film come about?

My film is about a couple of siblings who look into the mystery of the town’s polluted river. It was for my final year of university and leans on the idea that shocking truths are closer to us than we think. 

What where the biggest challenges you faced brining your film to life?

Writing the story with a strong complication was the hardest part. I’m definitely more of a designer than a writer. The film length also kept getting longer and hard to manage as we worked out the story. 

What where the biggest challenges you faced brining your film to life?

Writing the story with a strong complication was the hardest part. I’m definitely more of a designer than a writer. The film length also kept getting longer and hard to manage as we worked out the story. 

Looking back is there anything you would have done differently on this film?

I would have given more work to the people helping on the film instead of doing a major bulk of it by myself. 

"Though I hope it will prompt people to reconsider the world around them – especially those living comfortably."

Describe your film in three words?

Sweet, charming, fun.

Where did your passion for filmmaking come from?

Before streaming services were big in Australia, our home lost the tv antenna in a storm. I’d ask for DVDs from friends and watched behind-the-scenes content for the movies and shows I loved and then looked up more online. To this day, our tv still has no signal. 

What has been some of the best advice you’ve been give?

Stick to your gut. Of course, feedback from peers is helpful, but you are the one who has to watch the project from beginning to end and your name is the one that will be associated to it. 

Should filmmakers continue to push the boundaries of the films and stories they want to tell?

Yes, there are still many untold stories and the technology to help us make these films is always improving. 

Do you have any tips or advice you would offer a fellow filmmaker?

Nothing is set in stone. Despite the great amount you may have put in, you have to be ready to throw stuff out if it isn’t working. 

And finally, what do you hope people will take away from your film?

I’m happy for people to just enjoy the short as it’s not supposed to be too deep. Though I hope it will prompt people to reconsider the world around them – especially those living comfortably. I think the film has important ideas that could be further explored like environmental protection, helping those in need and the image we are presented of high-profile figures.  

© 2021 The New Current