14th BFI FUTURE FILM FESTIVAL, 2021

"I THINK PEOPLE SHOULD FOCUS ON LOCATING THEIR OWN VOICE AND VISION RATHER THAN GETTING BOGGED DON IN WHAT IS CURRENT, TRENDY OR EDGY."

India-Inés Levy
In The Garden
Comedy 
Section: BROKEN HEARTS

In The Garden screens as part of the BFI Future Film Festival from 18-21 February, free on

BFI Player

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1783. Berkshire, England. As the last day of summer draws to a close, Frederick and Clementine, two young and attractive aristocrats, talk beneath an old oak tree. Despite the idyllic setting, something more sinister begins to reveal itself. In the Garden provides a sneak peek into the complexities of romance, twisting genre conventions into something highly original and startlingly honest.

Hi India-Inés thank you for talking to TNC, how have you been holding up during these very strange times?

I’ve been well. I’ve just finished writing my debut feature film. Walking my dog and baking cakes has also got me through! 

Has this time offered you any new creative inspiration?

Definitely. I shot another short film during lockdown, using the constraints of the pandemic to create something unique. It’s called Mrs Ellroy and stars Jennifer Martin and is narrated by Bill Nighy.  It’s coming out in March which is exciting. 

Congratulations on having In The Garden selected for the BFI Future Film Festival, what does it mean to you to be part of Broken Hearts section?

It feels good to have my work recognised by such an incredible institution! 

Can you tell me a little bit about In The Garden, how did this film come about?

It’s hard to pinpoint exactly how it came about. I studied art history, I love regency period. I also love films that subvert genre and period into something new - sort of like rewriting history to create a hybrid. 

What were the biggest challenges you faced bringing this film to life?

Getting the right location. Period is so dependent on getting the right costume and location. We were lucky enough to shoot in Shottesbrooke Park, which had been used for Kingsman and Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. As it was my first ever short, another challenge was getting the right team on board. I was so lucky with this. 

"I like to think people will get an insight into a part of the world they’re unfamiliar with."

Looking back is there anything you would have done differently on this film?

As a first attempt at film I am overall super happy with it, so not really. 

What has been the most valuable lesson you have taken away from making In The Garden?

That I have the ability to make something unique when I have the right team behind me.

Have you always had a passion for filmmaking?

I have always had a passion for writing. Filmmaking is a means of getting my work off the page so people can see it and enjoy it.  I enjoy the other elements of filmmaking too - the production element but also the collaborative effort involved.

What has been some of the best advice you’ve been give?

No one can teach you how to be a writer/ director or what path to take to become one.

Should filmmakers continue to push the boundaries of the films and stories they want to tell?

Yes - for sure. I think people should focus on locating their own voice and vision rather than getting bogged down in what is current, trendy or edgy.

Do you have any tips or advice you would offer a fellow filmmaker?

To focus on developing good ideas/ stories so that they possess something of originality when they come to creating the film.

And finally, what do you hope people will take away from In The Garden?

That fusing genres can create something interesting.

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