FILM

Berlinale Shorts | 2019 

Flóra Anna Buda 

Writer/Director 
Entropia 

WORLD PREMIERE

Hungary

Berlinale Shorts I: Sparkling solitaires rival the sun

At the 2019 edition of Berlinale Shorts, 24 films from 17 countries will be competing for the Golden and Silver Bear, the Audi Short Film Award (endowed with 20,000 euros) and a nomination as “Berlin Short Film Candidate for the European Film Awards 2019”.

Entropia – a life without bras is possible, or how a fly paralysing the systems. An animated film from Hungary in which colour is hardly the only thing to lustfully explode.

 

Hi Flóra thanks for talking to TNC, you all set for the festival?

 

Yes! I’m very excited, but all the screening material is done so I’m just looking forward to go and see how the festival goes.

 

Are there any nerves ahead of your Berlinale screening?

 

Sure! Watching my film with the audience always makes me feel naked, especially in such a big event like Berlinale. I hope everything will be fine.

 

How does it feel to be having your World Premiere at the festival, does this add any additional pressure on you?

 

It does, but you know it is a good kind of pressure. It is more exciting than fearful.

 

Tell me a little bit about Entropia how did the film come about?

 

When I started writing Entropia I felt a bit lost and unconscious about myself. So I started to pay attention more and more and tried to figure out what kind of aspect do I have that makes me a person and a woman. I found three aspects I wanted to show and my idea was to accept all the three to find balance in my life. I wanted to make a film about a cycle of life, from chaos to that moment when everything is perfect. And I tried to be as honest as possible, not to idealize the situation.

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What was the biggest challenge you faced bringing this film to life?

 

I was working with many people. It was a huge crew comparing to the short form. It was a challenge to keep the film in style and finish it on time, but I learned a lot and all in all it was a great experience. I’m very grateful to all the amazing members of the crew.

"It is one of the most important things for me."

Have you always been interested in filmmaking?

 

Since I was a kid. It was the first profession I was dreaming about. First I was mostly interested in live action. I remember lying on the ground as a 6-year-old kid and the film was rolling in my head, it is still like that. But drawing was something I couldn’t stop doing so that is why I end up making animation. Before I went to study animation I was studying fashion design and also playing the flute. I still obsessed with creating objects and making music so animation perfectly contains all the things I love.

 

As a filmmaker how important is the collaborative process for you?

 

It is one of the most important things for me. To find people I can work with and inspire each other during the process is an amazing feeling, like when you find friends or fall in love. Normally I like to be alone and work alone so it was also a challenge to work with other artists and I would like to keep it like that because it was a great experience.

"I hope the audience will feel something liberating afterwards."

What are you currently working on?

 

I’m writing a short film about how love has changed these days and how different ways of relationships and decisions are happening. I use my personal experiences but the story will be an experimental fiction with complex narrative structure. In the meantime, I’m thinking about a VR project based on scientific research on dreams and hallucinations. And I have many other ideas too, but I save them for later.

 

And finally, what do you hope people will take away from this film?

 

I hope the audience will feel something liberating afterwards. Because that was the main purpose I did this film and since I believe that we are all one I hope my story will have an effect on other people too. If it is only one person I’m already satisfied.