British Shorts | 2020
"I know that doesn't sound like amazing advice but for me it really is, the more I make stuff the more people I meet, the more chances I get at creating my new projects and also your craft will improve massively as you will work with people who have a lot more experience."
 
Eject 
Dir. David Yorke 

Sat 18.1. 24:00 / Sputnik Kino 1

Festival Screening / Midnight Movies (only for 18s and older)

david-yorke.com 
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After discovering a USB port in her wrist, Kate uncovers a world where she has the ability to change herself for the better. But she will slowly discover that greed will come at a cost.

Hi David, thanks for talking to TNC, how is your 2020 going?


Other than trying and failing to get rid of my holiday weight, 2020 is going really well so far, I'm just happy the film is doing so well.

Congratulations on having Eject selected to British Shorts, what does it mean to you to be part of such a great showcase for British Films?


Thank you very much, it's a really great honour. Iv'e heard so many great things about the festival and to have my small film be a part of it really does mean a lot to me.

Do you ever get nervous ahead of a festival screening?


No not really, I actually get excited, I love to escape everyday life and enjoy some great content and meet fellow creatives and exchange our filmmaking stories.

How does it feel now to have Eject out there for audiences to enjoy?


It feels great, I'm just happy for people outside of London to see it and also keen to know what people take away from it and if it connects with them or not. 

What are the biggest challenges that face an independent filmmaker?  


I think the biggest challenge for a filmmaker, is to get noticed. Don't get me wrong It's now the easiest time to make a film, most of us have a phone with a fairly decent camera and a lot of us have access to editing software. The challenge is to stand out from the crowd and because the industry is so competitive it's very difficult to do that. The other factor is funding, with so many people wanting to make a film especially that makes an impression you need to surround yourself with a strong crew and talent and that costs money.

Can you tell me a little bit about Eject, how did this film come about?


I had the initial idea for Eject around 8 years ago, an image of a USB port in a persons wrist just popped into my mind, I can't explain why, but I often day dream and come up with weird ideas from time to time.


Even though I knew what I wanted the story to be, it still took me a long time to come up with the execution.  I made a few other shorts in the meantime and then came back to this later and bounce the idea around with friends and then finally cracked it. 

What was the inspiration behind this film?


I'm a big fan of horror and sci-fi and I often write character driven pieces, so watching a lot of people I admire like Wes Craven, John Carpenter and Ari Aster inspired me to tackle a new horror short. One of the other main inspirations was strangely enough 'Me'. I have a terrible memory and I wanted to explore the idea of 'What would you do if you could access a greater knowledge?' then other questions came into play 'What sort of knowledge' and 'How Much?' then I thought 'What knowledge would you remove to make way for the new stuff?'. I found that concept fascinating.

What would you say have been the biggest lessons you've taken from making Eject?


Simply put this film shouldn't have been made, I'll explain. 'Eject' required a much bigger budget then we had, I know most filmmakers say that all the time but this should have been a 10k plus budget, it was 2k, I funded it myself and cut a lot of corners. This wasn't fair to my cast and crew as it put them in position where they had to work very long hours and that's one of the reasons why this was my toughest shoot yet.


There where many issues throughout the shoot and I learnt a lot, but one thing was consistent, my cast and crew put up with the conditions and delivered and I'm very grateful for that.

"Two of the shorts I have written features for, so hopefully I get the opportunity to tackle my first feature before I reach 40."

Have you always had a passion for filmmaking?


I have been making films ever since I was 11 years old, so yeah you could say that. I have just always loved telling stories and making films, but the strange thing is I feel like I'm just getting started. Technology changes as does the world so I'm always learning something new and applying that to my storytelling.

How much has your approach to your films changed since your debut?


Not a great deal, for me it's always been the same ingredients story and characters. That to me is still the most important part of filmmaking. You can change the look of your film in many different ways but if the audience doesn't connect to it your film falls flat.

What has been the best piece of advice you've been given?


It's very simple, keep making stuff. I know that doesn't sound like amazing advice but for me it really is, the more I make stuff the more people I meet, the more chances I get at creating my new projects and also your craft will improve massively as you will work with people who have a lot more experience.

Is there any advice you would offer an aspiring filmmaker?


Please see above.

What are you currently working on?


I have three shorts written and ready to go, 2 dramas and a horror, but because of my experience on 'Eject' I 'm approaching it with more care and for that I need to secure funding. I'm applying to schemes and meeting producers who hopefully connect with the material and will want to collaborate with me. Two of the shorts I have written features for, so hopefully I get the opportunity to tackle my first feature before I reach 40.

And finally, what message do you want your audiences to take away from Eject?

  
Learn to walk before you can run. It will make sense when you see the film.

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